History

2019

The parameters of the Job Succession Scholarship are modified to become more inclusive. All Prescott and Russell secondary schools participate, totalling 12 high schools and one adult training school. We solicited the community to increase the number of available scholarships and four local businesses and organizations joined the project. Fourteen scholarships are now available to Prescott and Russell youth.

2019

The Centre adopts a triennial strategic plan following a Board and Leadership Committee retreat. Expert consultants guided the work that also led to renewed mission, vision, values and principles statements. An action plan and a communication strategic plan will also be developed.

2019

An agreement is signed with the Economic and Social Council of Ottawa-Carleton to launch service offerings for newcomers and immigrants in Prescott and Russell. A coordinator is hired to implement this immigration project deemed of importance for the Prescott and Russell region.

2019

The Centre receives a first grant dedicated to help immigrant women in search of employment. The project name is Feminine Plural.The Centre receives a first grant dedicated to help immigrant women in search of employment. The project name is Feminine Plural.

2018

The Executive Director (ED) creates a Leadership Committee to support her in the management approach and reorientation of the Centre. Other than the ED, the committee includes 10 support and management staff members.

2018

The Centre launches the Job Succession Scholarship, a five-year project representing a $250,000 investment. The project will award 10 annual scholarships of $5,000 each to high school graduates pursuing post-secondary studies in a high-demand trade or profession in the region, where students have to come back to work. The goal is to counter youth exodus and to support the development of specialized skills in the region. The four Prescott and Russell school boards join the project and graduates from seven schools may apply for the scholarships.

2018

Mrs. Caroline Arcand, the new Executive Director, takes office.Mrs. Caroline Arcand, the new Executive Director, takes office.

2018

Mr. André Roy goes into well-earned retirement after working 27 years as Executive Director of the Employment Services Centre.

2017

In light of its financial performance, the employment agency Contak, Staffing Solutions is incorporated and becomes a division of the Centre.

2016

The Centre launches a project to support the creation of new business ventures through loans. The goal is to support job and business creation as well as provide the Centre with returns on investment.

2016

Integration of employability workshops to the Centre’s service offering. A workshop committee is created to organize fall sessions aimed at job seekers in the Prescott and Russell region.

2013

Following a decision made in the previous fall, our employment agency gets its own name and a new organizational structure. Contak, Staffing Solutions is created along with a brand image.

2012

The Centre organizes the first Job Fair for the Prescott and Russell region. The event is a local success and continues for six years with growing popularity.

2012

The Centre launches several marketing initiatives including a new website, corporate Facebook and Linkedin accounts and a first advertising campaign in local newspapers.

2011

Launch of the Centre’s new brand image that marks the implementation of a first marketing strategy.

2011

Tabling of a study report leading to the first strategic marketing plan.

2011

The Centre employs approximately 30 people.

2011

More than 17,000 clients come through our doors and we post close to 1,400 job offers on our job boards per year. Moreover, we award more than 1,100 grants to local employers.

2009-2010

The Centre becomes a one-stop service provider for Employment Ontario.

2009-2010

The Centre commissions the firm Lalande et Associés from Plantagenet to conduct market research and create a first strategic marketing plan. The project aims to better promote the Centre to local potential clientele while supporting the team’s needs.

2008

Construction of the Centre’s Rockland building to house new offices and several tenants.

2007

The Centre wins again the Ministry’s Award for best results in the province of Ontario, ahead of 160 provincial service providers.

2004

The Centre receives the Ministry’s Award for best results in the province of Ontario, ahead of 160 provincial service providers.

2003

Purchase of the three-storey building (15,000 sq ft) located at 134 Main Street in Hawkesbury. The building also houses several other tenants.

1998

Creation of a temporary employment agency within the Centre to better meet the needs of the organization and clients.

1997

The Centre now provides services for 6,000 clients in Prescott and Russell.

1997

Opening of a third office located in Embrun to better serve the County of Russell.

1993

Addition of several programs and services: 

  • Ministry of Community and Social Services: youth support; Ontario Works Program; paid work placements for Ontario Works;
  • Ministry of Labour: retraining of the workforce for several companies;
  • Ministry of Health: counselling; assessment; testing; placement of laid-off staff for a few organizations;
  • Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC): Work Orientation Workshop; School First Program; Richelieu & Hamilton Islands Project; reception centre for unemployment and social services applications. Counselling, testing and needs assessment; placement of clients receiving unemployment benefits; summary of return to work plans; management of HRDC’s client records and action plans; Community Access Program; recreational trail.

1993

Algonquin College closes its service and the ministry transfers funding to the Centre to serve the entire territory of Prescott and Russell.Algonquin College closes its service and the ministry transfers funding to the Centre to serve the entire territory of Prescott and Russell.

1993

⦁ Opening of a second office to serve the county of Russell.

1993

⦁ We now serve 900 clients per year.

1993

Addition of two employees to better serve the Centre’s clientele.

1992

Start of the Ontario Works Program.

1992

The number of clients served by the Centre increases to 600.

1991

The Centre is incorporated as Employment Services Centre of Prescott and Russell and a new brand logo is created.

1991

A first service contract is negotiated with the Ministry of Community and Social Services: Supervision of community hours.

1991

ACE includes three employment counsellors and less than 400 clients.

1991

Mr. André Roy is appointed as the new Executive Director. His mandate is to restore the financial health of the Centre.

1983

Foundation of Action Consultation Emploi / Action Consultation Employment. The acronym ACE is often used to identify the five-employee organization. ACE manages only one program called Avenir/Futures, which is aimed at youth aged 15 to 24 and is funded by the Ministry of Education.